The Importance of Crowns in Dentistry

Author: Leo Parker

Leo Parker

Leo Parker, is a dental blogger who writes about many different facets of the dental industry, whether these are cosmetic dentistry procedures, such as dental implants, or more routine treatments that dentists carry out every day, like root canals or dental crowns.
04.27.12 / 9:31 am

When you look at the multitude of dental treatments that are routinely carried out, few procedures have stood the test of time as impressively as the use of dental crowns. There are many reasons that a person may require crowns on their teeth and this is, of course, at the discretion of their dentist, because they are in the best position to know the requirements of their patients.

But why are crowns one of the most frequently carried out dental procedures in the UK and abroad? Well, let’s take a look at the main features of crowns and why they are one of the cornerstones of the dental industry.

Is the Crown Slipping?

It wouldn’t appear so. Crowns consistently remain a mainstay of most dental practices, and this treatment is carried out with great regularity. But why are crowns such an important tool of the dentistry trade? The main reasons that dental crowns are used include:

  • Crowns are regularly used as a means of improving the appearance of a badly broken-down tooth or one that has been heavily filled.
  • Another common function of crowns is to support one end of a bridge which is replacing other missing teeth.
  • Crowns are also important in dentistry because they can be instrumental in helping to strengthen a weak or badly broken-down tooth.

One of the biggest differences between the types of crowns commonly used in dentistry is the material with which the crown itself is made. Each of these different materials will have their own characteristics and features which differentiate them from their counterparts – so let’s take a look at the different materials used in the manufacture of crowns:

  • All-Gold Crowns – If you opt for this type of crown, you will find that it is crafted from yellow or white dental gold. All gold dental crowns are extremely resilient and resistant to biting forces, and they are probably the best choice when crowns need to be deployed in areas where there is little space for the bite.
  • All-Porcelain Crowns – If you’re looking for a crown with the most natural appearance, then all-porcelain crowns are likely to be the solution for you. However, the downside of porcelain crowns tends to be the fact that they are not as strong as those crowns which have been reinforced with metal. As such, porcelain crowns are invariably used at the front of the mouth, where the bite isn’t so forceful.

When it comes to treating broken or damaged teeth with crowns, it is extremely important that a good foundation is built on what is left of the tooth, as this is required to help support the crown once it has been applied. Generally speaking, the foundation used prior to the placement of a crown will either be a large filling held in place with adhesives, or a laboratory-prepared cast gold post which will be cemented into place on the tooth in question.

There are some cases where further preparatory work will be required prior to the use of dental crowns. For example, sometimes the nerves of the tooth that is to be crowned may be damaged and, if this is the case, the dentist may well suggest root canal treatment prior to considering the addition of a crown to the tooth.

Author, Leo Parker, is a dental blogger who writes about many different facets of the dental industry, whether these are cosmetic dentistry procedures, such as dental implants, or more routine treatments that dentists carry out every day,  like root canals or dental crowns.

Leo Parker

Leo Parker, is a dental blogger who writes about many different facets of the dental industry, whether these are cosmetic dentistry procedures, such as dental implants, or more routine treatments that dentists carry out every day, like root canals or dental crowns.

4 responses to “The Importance of Crowns in Dentistry”

  1. Very helpful article. My dentist keeps telling me I should get a crown before one of my filled molars cracks. This give me a bit more insight should I decide to go with the crown.

    Thanks,
    HAL

  2. As far as fit. form, and function go, the best way to restore a second molar is with a Gold Based dental alloy crown. it is the most reliable, time proven restoration available.

  3. This was a really interesting read, I had no idea that there were actually reasons behind why certain crowns are made out of different materials. After all, it does make a lot of sense that a crown made of metal would be much better at handling the wear and tear that chewing causes. However, I also didn’t know that crowns were used to help support dental bridges as well, which probably means I’ll be getting some soon to help with the replacement of a tooth I had pulled last summer.

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