Black Powder = Pearly White Teeth

Author: Dental Geek
10.16.14 / 12:38 pm

I’m the first to admit that I’m usually behind hot trends; I started watching Game of Thrones last March; I’ve only had a Twitter for about a month and I’m still genuinely impressed with the 2-in-1 toothpaste/mouthwash combo. However, when I heard about a charcoal-based alternative to toothpaste, I needed to see what that was all about.

Here at The Dental Geek, we obtained a jar of inVitamin’s All Natural Tooth & Gum Powder with Activated Charcoal. It looks like a little container of black sand, but open up the jar and you’ll get a nice mint aroma. The charcoal-based tooth powder is as all-natural as you can get and “contains no synthetic additives, preservatives, foaming agents, fluoride, artificial colors or flavors, and no abrasive baking soda or salt” according to the accompanying information sheet.

The first great mystery of this charcoal tooth and gum powder is how to actually use it. Standard toothpaste needs no instructions past ‘squeeze,’ but using the charcoal powder isn’t exactly an intuitive process. The instructions say, “it is best to pour a little powder onto the palm of your hand, wet your toothbrush, and rub your toothbrush into the powder on your hand.” This is where I found a small issue with the charcoal powder: once you open the jar there’s no filtering lid that would let you easily get a small amount of the powder onto your hand. I ended up with a sizeable amount of the powder left over after rubbing my toothbrush into my palm.

Taste is one of the most important aspects of any oral health product. A lot of people will choose the better tasting product over one that offers extra health benefits. I was apprehensive about the taste of the charcoal powder, but thankfully it matched up with the minty smell! Texture aside, you can’t distinguish the charcoal powder from any minty toothpaste from a tube.

The instructions say that, “if you are new to tooth powder, it can be a little messy at first.” This warning is definitely something to keep in mind. Setting aside the inherently messy process of dumping the powder into your hand and rubbing your toothbrush into it, you’re going to be giving your sink a cleaning after your standard brushing – every time you spit mid-brush, you’ll leave a spray of black across your sink. You’ll also be spitting black for at least an hour after brushing, even if you use mouthwash.

Not all of the ‘messy’ aspects of the charcoal powder are a bad thing, though. The first time I used it, I cocked an eyebrow at my black teeth mid-brush, but it’s really an ironic scenario since my teeth felt a lot cleaner and my breath a lot fresher after using the charcoal powder than using my standard toothpaste. I really enjoyed that I had to make my teeth black and dirty looking to make them feel incredibly clean.

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While the powder did a great job on its own, the best results came when I mixed it with my standard tube of toothpaste. No, this wasn’t a harebrained experiment. The instructions noted that “some people also have mixed the powder with conventional toothpaste and have had good results.” Just dabbing a bit of the powder on my toothbrush was a lot less messy and removed the clunky process of dumping the powder into my palm and rubbing my toothbrush into it.

All in all, I think everyone should give this stuff a fair chance. Whether you’re looking for the greenest toothpaste possible, an awesome supplement to your brand of choice or even just a change of pace, this all-natural tooth and gum powder with activated charcoal is worth your time. Yes it’s a bit messy, but your teeth will thank you for it.

For more information on inVitamin’s All Natural Tooth & Gum Powder with Activated Charcoal you can visit www.invitamin.com.

Dental Geek

Dental Geek

6 responses to “Black Powder = Pearly White Teeth”

  1. Charcoal is entirely too abrasive for teeth. Just like oil pulling, this fad is probably going to end up causing more inconvenience for most users and do more harm than good. I really wish people would stop advocating for ‘alternative’ cleaning treatments that have no grounding in actual medical science.

    • I have recently purchased it & i can promise you, bc it is pure powder, there is only a smither of grains. Its working really really well.

  2. I have heard of this as well, but have been pretty apprehensive to try it. Like most people, I’m pretty set in my oral hygiene ways. Even if I wasn’t though, the idea of putting a black charcoal-based powder in my mouth is a little bit off-putting. But after reading this, I think I might try it in combination with my normal toothpaste!

  3. As a child i used to nosh n’ chew on black and brown crayola crayons ( always felt those crayons along with grey and white got a bum deal).As a teen there were episodes of chewing tree bark ( my mom wouldn’t let me go camping for a weekend somewhere near ” woodstock” , bummer ).As a young adult there were brands of Crest, Aim, Pearl Drops, Tom’s,Colgate to name a few.As an older adult (younger mentally) I think I would enjoy trying this green way to enhance the teeth brush.Good looking out yo.Looking forward to trying your discovery. Keep Calm and brush on and on……..

  4. Can I use pure charcoal instead? Or that basically made for stomach upset? It has the same effect I guess. And for how long should I be using them so that there is apparent results?

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